Learning & Development Professional Development Opportunities: Virtual & Central Ohio

This week is STACKED for professional development opportunities in Central Ohio and virtually. Here is my shortlist for the week:

Tuesday, August 13:

DISRUPT HR! IT’S TIME TO DISRUPT HR AND APPROACH IT IN A WHOLE NEW WAY

This event is held by the Human Resource Association of Central Ohio.  Jennifer McClure is a frequent guest on Catalyst Sale podcast hosted by my friend Mike Simmons. She has some exciting news to share about an event coming to Columbus and I’m sad I’ll be missing this event at the Boathouse. The event starts at 11:15AM ET and Jenn is hosting a personal brand workshop afterwards.

Building Knowledge Management-7 Tangible Steps to Creating a Culture of Peer to Peer Connection and Mentorship

This event is a Central Ohio ATD event and is our monthly program. Daniel James from Instructure is our presenter. I’ll be the webinar host and you should tune in because I have some super exciting announcements about future programming. This webinar starts at noon ET.

Wednesday, August 14:

TLDCast, the EMU Experience

Wednesday’s TLDCast is hosted by my friend Toddi Norum. I’m really interested in knowing what EMU means. Maybe I need to host a show called the CAMEL experience 🙂 This webinar starts at 11:00AM ET.

Personalization: Branding Your Learning Program(s)

This TrainingMagNetwork webinar features Allen Partridge. I really like this topic and I’m looking forward to hearing what he has to say about how to brand learning programs. This webinar starts at noon ET.

Future of Work Networking Event, Sponsored by Desire2Learn

I’m super excited the kind folks at D2L reached out to Central Ohio ATD to host this event. All are welcome by kindly RSVP. Food and beverage are provided. This event starts at 6:00PM.

Thursday, August 15:

HOW HR AND L&D CAN BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE

If you have an Association for Talent Development membership, this webinar looks like a good use of your time on Thursday. I enjoy hearing how others approach performance gaps.

Friday, August 16:

Learning and Development Mystery Series: The Case of the Disengaged Learner

I’m excited about giving this presentation for HRACO. This is version 3.0 of my presentation based on a literature review about learner engagement. This version will be tweaked one more time based on feedback to create my final Devlearn version. To see version 2.0 of this presentation, check out the TLDC conference archive.

Other Learning Opportunities:

Here are some of the things I’m listening to (when it’s not task playlists and The Jonas Brothers)

Make It Stick The Science of Successful Learning

Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism


https://www.theloungepodcast.com/
Hosted by my dear friend Jac Hutchinson

Kickstart for next week

Join me with the amazing Mike “The Toolman” Taylor on my monthly Learning Technologies show on TLDCast.

So what about you? What are you looking forward to this week? How are you going to continue to grow in your own learning? Sound off in the comments!

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Being Your Unapologetic Self

I still remember theses lines from a poem I had to memorize in high school English:

“Don’t be fooled by me.

Don’t be fooled by the face I wear

For I wear a mask. I wear a thousand masks-

masks that I’m afraid to take off

and none of them are me.”

I get it, it can be scary to be you.  You don’t think you are good enough. You are afraid of what someone will comment.    I promise to you if you really want to cut above the noise just be yourself. That’s it.  I also recognize that this is something I do not struggle with.  I realize there are many folks out there who battle imposter syndrome.  In fact, we all battle imposter syndrome to some degree.  If no one else tells you this, I will. You are good enough the way you are and YOU can really make an impact on your profession. Here are things you don’t need to do:

  • Having a LinkedIn headline that claims you are a ninja, guru, or some other claim.

  • Calling yourself a thought leader, get over yourself, please.

  • Using headshots from 20 years ago, when people see you at a conference they shouldn’t have to be told who you are.

  • Filtering your picture so you have different colored eyes, seriously you aren’t fooling anyone.

But I’m still scared!  

There are many people out there doing their own thing and killing it.  Look no further than Brian Fanzo

You can be yourself and have discretion.  You don’t have to share everything.  It’s a balance between authenticity and transparency.  Here’s how I distinguish between the two:

Authenticty is what makes you, you.  Your secret sauce, your preferences, everything that makes you human.  Within your perspectives, you share your truth.  By doing that, you are authentic.

Transparency, on the other hand, is to what degree you share your truth.  You have different relationships with people in your life.  You likely wouldn’t share something personal with an acquaintance but you may open up quicker to a friend.  The beauty of being yourself online is that you can be authentic and not share everything.  You aren’t being devious, you are just exercising your discretion.  

If you want to learn more about how to build your digital brand to be more like you, select the image below to read my piece, Is My Digital Brand Human?, in Training Journal. 

 

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A Tools Faceoff! Google Slides VS Microsoft Powerpoint-Which is Best for Closed Captioning?

Did you know that Microsoft Powerpoint and Google Slides do live closed captioning during presentations? Last year was the first time I used the feature in a presentation and I’ve been hooked on using it ever since. Why?

  1. I talk fast sometimes.
  2. My southern accent comes out on certain words (pen, roof, pain). My husband’s favorite words to hear me say are “hill” and “ten”.
  3. Often times people may not be able to hear and miss out on key points.
  4. It’s helpful for English language learners to see subtitles.
  5. It can provide a more accessible experience for attendees
  6. It can provide a way for folks on a webinar to watch without audio.
  7. I think it makes me a better presenter as I’m not as likely to say silly things or sailor words while I have closed captioning on.

There are other benefits as well but those are some of the reasons I like to use it. I’ll never forget the magic of the first time I used this technique. Attendees wanted to know how I was doing the live closed captioning so, of course, I shared how I use Google Slides.

More About Google Slides Live Closed Captioning

I first became aware of Google Slides live closed-captioning in October of 2018. The minute I saw it, I knew I had to try it. Google Slides works on any type of system since it’s cloud-based. I also love the fact that it takes just two clicks to get it active. See it in action in the video below:

If you’d like to try it for yourself, here is a Google slides presentation for you.

Pros and Cons of Google Slides

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Device agnostic
  • Keeps up with speaker pace for captioning

Cons:

  • Only captions in English
  • Cannot save .txt file of captions
  • Audience cannot control the translation language

More About Microsoft Powerpoint Live Closed Captioning

Soon after I became aware of Google Slides closed-captioning, I learned about Microsoft Powerpoint offering the same service. Powerpoint offered new options such as letting the audience control the language they see and allowed presenters to download a text file of the captions. To use this, you have to use Microsoft 365 Powerpoint and download a plug-in that you must configure before you use. For a while, this only worked on a PC and didn’t work on a Mac. A few months ago they rolled it out to Macs too.

Once configured, you can choose from a few different languages it will live closed-caption including English, Spanish, and Chinese. Here’s where it gets a little bit complicated. Each presentation you use this on, you are given a code that is displayed as a URL in the presentation that audience attendees can go to and select the language they want to receive captioning in. I admit this feature is pretty robust as it supports more than 60 languages. This takes a bit of education on the part of the speaker for the audience to understand how to use it. Also, it requires the audience member to have a device in their hand to watch the closed-captions on. The presentation only supports one language closed captioning during the presentation (from the presenter’s screen).

Here is an example of how the subtitles look in presentation mode on a PC. You can see in the upper right-hand corner the URL to access local control of the subtitles.

It also looks different on a PC vs a Mac. Here are some screenshots I took from my PC:

Once the plug-in is enabled, you will access the captioning feature under the “Slide Show” option on the ribbon.
You have the option on PC to have this go in front of your title slide to encourage audience members to have control of the language captions on their own device. I did not see this option for a slide on the Mac version.
Here are some of the options for the way the closed captioning will be displayed in Powerpoint.

Want to see this in action on a Mac? Check it out!

Want to try it? Don’t forget you have to install this plug-in and be using Microsoft Office 365 Powerpoint. Here is a Powerpoint presentation for you to test it out.

Pros and Cons of Microsoft Powerpoint

Pros:

  • Provides an option to mute the audience so it is only picking up primary speaker
  • Supports multiple languages for captioning
  • Saves captions as a text file for future captioning use

Cons:

  • Doesn’t keep up with the speaker’s voice as quickly as Google Slides (in my experience)
  • Takes extra time to educate the audience about set-up and usage
  • Must install an extra plug-in, it isn’t native to the software.

Who wins the face-off? Ultimately it is up to you to determine which best fits your needs. I’m biased towards Google Slides but I appreciate the additional features in Powerpoint.

So there you have it, two tools you can use for live closed-captioning. Let me know if you’ve used these features before in the comments below.

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Two Things You Should Know About Recent Research in Behavior-Change

I’ve been on the road a lot lately, making frequent trips out of state to visit family.  These long multi-hour drives can get boring but thank goodness for podcasts. One of my favorite podcasts is Freakonomics.  The reason I love Freakonomics so much is that they often take the most pedestrian topic and make it interesting.  A recent episode, titled How Goes the Behavior-Change Revolution? (Ep. 382) was quite interesting and featured some of the brightest minds in psychology to explore humans and behavior change. No matter what your occupation, you have to deal with people in some capacity.  Here are two takeaways I had from recent research and how you can apply it to learning and development.

Making the simple too complex

No bones about it, Laurie Santos loves dogs.  Santos says dogs are like humans because we have socialized them to be like us.  Let’s explore her study, Dogs do not demonstrate a human-like bias to defer to communicative cues.  Here’s what she had to say: 

"In one study we focused on a particular phenomenon that researchers call “overimitation,” which as you might guess is imitating too much. Here’s the phenomenon in humans. Imagine I show you some crazy puzzle box, you don’t know how it works. And I say, “I’m going to explain to you how it works.” I’m going to tap this thing on the top. I’m going to do all these steps and I open the puzzle box and I give it to you. If it was some hard-to-figure-out puzzle box, you might just copy me.
But imagine I give you a really easy puzzle box, just a completely transparent box. Nothing on it. It just had a door that you could open to get food out. But you watch me do all these crazy steps, I tap on the side, I spin it around a few times, I do all these things. You might hope that humans are smart enough to say, “That was a really dumb way to open the box. Give it to me, I’m going to open the door.”
But it turns out that’s not what humans do. Humans will follow slavishly all these dumb steps that they see someone else do, just in case. And we thought the same dumb copying behaviors that we see humans do, we should probably see in dogs as well.
Here’s how we set it up. We made a dog-friendly puzzle box, easy enough for the dogs to understand. So it was a transparent box with a lid that was really obvious, and if you flip the lid up you could get inside and get a piece of food. But we added this extraneous lever on the side of the box, and we showed dogs, “Hey here’s how you open it.” You have to move the lever back and forth, it takes a really long time, lever, lever, lever, lever, and then at that point you can open the box. Now in theory if we did this with a human they would say, “I don’t really understand.” Then lever, lever, lever, lever, lever, lever, open the box. That’s actually what humans four-year-olds do, there’s some wonderful videos online where you can see this. And what do the dogs do? Ran over, lifted the lid, and got the food. What this is telling us is that we’ve created this species that learns from us a ton. They follow our cues all the time. But they’re actually smarter at learning from us than we are at learning from ourselves."

What Does This Mean for Us in Learning and Development?

How often have you evaluated your own department’s processes and “tribal knowledge”?  Do you go through all these complicated steps in order to build a learning product?  Do you assume everything is supposed to be an eLearning?  

It’s easy to fall into these pitfalls, especially when you are new or have a “Sarge in charge” kind of manager or culture that doesn’t embrace innovation.  Yes those managers and workplaces are out there so if you don’t work in one of these situations, count your blessings.  How can you check to see that the way you manage your projects is effective?  How do you know your process is right?  The answer is experimentation.  Try something new, measure the effectiveness, and learn and grow.  

Taruna Goel shared this gem on Twitter about the importance of *gasp* focusing on the end user.  If we create clunkly learning products that are cumbersome for the end user, we are part of the problem.  To do clean and simple correctly IS difficult for a reason, we WANT to overcomplicate things.  Resist the tempatation!

The Opposite of Nudge is Sludge

Richard Thaler defines a nudge as some small — possibly small — feature of the environment that influences our choices but still allows us to do anything we want.”  That’s easy enough to understand, so what is sludge?  Here is how he explained it: 

"Nudges typically work by making something easy, like automatically signing you up for the retirement plan. Sludge is the gunk that comes out as a byproduct. And I’m using it for stuff that slows you down in ways that make you worse off. So for example, suppose that there is a subscription and, they automatically renew your subscription. But to unsubscribe you have to call. And I had this experience. The first review of my book Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics came out in the Times of London. My editor sent me an email excitedly telling me this and sending me the link. And I log on and there’s this paywall. And I said, “Oh, I can’t read it.” But there’s a trial subscription for one pound for a month. And I said, “Oh well, I’m willing to pay a pound to read the first review of my book.” But then I start reading the fine print and in order to quit, you have to call London, during London business hours, not on a toll-free line, and you have to give them two weeks’ notice. That is sludge."

What Does This Mean for us in Learning and Development?

Sometimes I feel like we are sludge factories.  We create all of these learning products but then hide them behind systems where you have to log in via two-factor authetnications.  Or we create things that aren’t optimized for tablets and phones.  Or we make people contact us for a certificate of completion (this too still happens)!  Mike Taylor asked during one of his keynotes hw many people log into their LMS daily to see what new offerings there are.  In a room full of learning and development professionals, not a single hand raised.  

Regardless of how you got into this profession, I know and you know you did it for the nudge and not the sludge.  You enjoy seeing someone win at work, you enjoy seeing the “lightbulbs” pop up above folk’s heads, you just enjoy being part of helping people do their jobs better and grow.  Sludge doesn’t do this.  Sludge is why so many people hate eLearning, presentations, all of it.  Fight the sludge, advocate for the end users!

So what about you?  Do you listen to podcasts outside of L&D that provide some food for thought?  Share them in the comments below.  Also if you’d like to listen to this full episode (which I highly recommend), you can find it here:

 

According
to
the
Occupational
Outlook
Handbook,
the
job
outlook
for
learning
and
developmen
t
specialists
will
grow
by
11%
from
2016-2026
Click
HERE
to
view
source
(US
Bureau
of
Labor
Statistics,
2018)
.
With
training
being
a
constan
t
scapegoa
t
to
corporate
disasters
and
poor
behavior,
it
is
clear
that
instruc
tional
designers
are
high
in
demand
for
many
reasons.
Many
companies
turn
to
training
programs
for
legal
defensibili
ty
in
some
situations
and
others
use
it
as
a
punitive
option
for
bad
behavior
on
the
job.
Regardless
of
the
reason,
there
are
many
job
openings
in
corporate
learning and de
velopmen
t that require a vast arr
ay of skills.
To
organize
this
analysis
of
corporate
job
postings,
we
used
the
Associa
tion
for
Talent
and
Developmen
t’s
(ATD)
training
and
developmen
t
competency
model
and
its
componen
ts
to
classif
y
each
job
posting.
The
Associa
tion
for
Talent
and
Developmen
t
is
a
professional
developmen
t
organiza
tion
for
learning
and
developmen
t
professionals.
In
addition
to
the
national
chapter
and
local
chapters,
the
organiza
tion
also
has
a
credentialing
body
where
learning
and
developmen
t
professionals
can
become
a
Certified
Professional
in
Learning
Performanc
e
(CPLP).
The
knowledge
test
for
the
CPLP
is
made
up
of
questions
from
each
area
of
the
ATD
Compe
tency
Model
Figure
1.1.
Each
portion
of
the
competency
model
has
substa
tes
that
explain
more
about
the
piece
of
the
model.
The
pieces
of
the
model
are
performanc
e
improvement,
change
managemen
t,
knowledge
managemen
t,
coaching,
integrated
talent
managemen
t,
manag
ing
learning
programs,
evaluating
learning
impac
t,
learning
technolog
ies,
training
delivery,
and
instruc
tional
design.
The
founda
tional
competencies
of
the
model
will
also
be
explored but w
ere not a driving f
orce of this anal
ysis

 

According
to
the
Occupational
Outlook
Handbook,
the
job
outlook
for
learning
and
developmen
t
specialists
will
grow
by
11%
from
2016-2026
Click
HERE
to
view
source
(US
Bureau
of
Labor
Statistics,
2018)
.
With
training
being
a
constan
t
scapegoa
t
to
corporate
disasters
and
poor
behavior,
it
is
clear
that
instruc
tional
designers
are
high
in
demand
for
many
reasons.
Many
companies
turn
to
training
programs
for
legal
defensibili
ty
in
some
situations
and
others
use
it
as
a
punitive
option
for
bad
behavior
on
the
job.
Regardless
of
the
reason,
there
are
many
job
openings
in
corporate
learning and de
velopmen
t that require a vast arr
ay of skills.
To
organize
this
analysis
of
corporate
job
postings,
we
used
the
Associa
tion
for
Talent
and
Developmen
t’s
(ATD)
training
and
developmen
t
competency
model
and
its
componen
ts
to
classif
y
each
job
posting.
The
Associa
tion
for
Talent
and
Developmen
t
is
a
professional
developmen
t
organiza
tion
for
learning
and
developmen
t
professionals.
In
addition
to
the
national
chapter
and
local
chapters,
the
organiza
tion
also
has
a
credentialing
body
where
learning
and
developmen
t
professionals
can
become
a
Certified
Professional
in
Learning
Performanc
e
(CPLP).
The
knowledge
test
for
the
CPLP
is
made
up
of
questions
from
each
area
of
the
ATD
Compe
tency
Model
Figure
1.1.
Each
portion
of
the
competency
model
has
substa
tes
that
explain
more
about
the
piece
of
the
model.
The
pieces
of
the
model
are
performanc
e
improvement,
change
managemen
t,
knowledge
managemen
t,
coaching,
integrated
talent
managemen
t,
manag
ing
learning
programs,
evaluating
learning
impac
t,
learning
technolog
ies,
training
delivery,
and
instruc
tional
design.
The
founda
tional
competencies
of
the
model
will
also
be
explored but w
ere not a driving f
orce of this anal
ysis

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It Started With A Tweet (#ISWAT) How to be more representative in stock art

I love social media, especially Twitter. I was a relatively late adopter but joined Twitter in 2016 after attending a session for Central Ohio ATD by Mike Taylor. In this session, Mike talked about the value of Twitter for professional development. Fast forward to today and Twitter has helped me grow my network and gain knowledge and skills to make me a better L&D professional. For me, Twitter is my version of golfing, having coffee, and going out to lunch with my peers. Twitter gives me instant access to learning and development professionals all around the world. I’m able to ask questions and learn from them and with them.

This kicks off a series I’ll be publishing on Wednesdays called It Started With a Tweet or #ISWAT. I hope to share the conversation and some additional tips and resources. In this inaugural blog, I am going to dive into a huge problem: lack of diversity in stock art for design.

It Started With a Tweet…

I posted this out of frustration as I looked for a photo of leadership. All I saw were men. Smiling white men. I thought I couldn’t be the only person who had this problem so here is how the conversation unfolded.

Joe has a great point here. It reminds me of a situation that Sean Hickey and I had a few years ago where a stakeholder told us that using diverse names can confuse test takers. Luckily, someone else fought that battle for us.

I’ve sent a direct message to both Tricia and Judy to see if they have any resources posted I can link to from their session.

There are so many jokes I could make here but I’ll let someone else do that for me.

Stop what you are doing right now and connect with Amy. I met her at the Association for Education Communications and Technology conference last year and I have learned so much from her. She shares great resources about accessibility and inclusiveness. She also has a great point here, why do so many stock art examples not show real life?

Yes, yes, and YES!!!!

These photos have a Creative Commons license and I love this snippet from their website:

Stock photos that accompany articles do more than illustrate subject matter. They have the power to shape perceptions of entire communities. When used critically, they can chip away at harmful stereotypes, pushing more accurate perceptions and understandings to the fore.

https://broadlygenderphotos.vice.com

YES! We should be having these conversations and asking vendors to be more inclusive. In this conversation, there was a vendor that someone else called out for their lack of diversity in their stock art. The vendor responded by acknowleding the issue and sharing their committment to resolve it.

So what are some ways you can be part of the solution to make learning and development artifacts more inclusive?  Here are some tips:

Use ROYGBIV for skin colors:

ROYGBIV is an easy way to remember the colors in a spectrum. It’s also a fun and easy way to take the emphasis off of race of characters. You are more likely to do this with vector images. My pal Jonathan Rock and co-worker Casey Rinehart have done this successfully in recent eLearning. Casey created a lunchroom scene where the kids had green, purple, and pink skin. It was well done and didn’t distract from the content of the module.

Create your own stock art/library:

I know this can be hard to do on a limited clock and budget but hear me out. If you take the time to re-work a vector to have different skin color or if you find a free-use stock image that is representative, hoard it! Treasure it. SHARE IT WITH THE COMMUNITY! We all have a responsibility to be part of the solution here and I know I’m not the only L&D Gollum scooping all those links and resources shared on social media.

(MY PRECIOUS STOCK ART)

I actually mentioned this idea at Learning Solutions in March this year during the Guild for Good meeting as something that would be a great project for the community. It’s that important that if we all do a little, we can make a big impact

Know where to go:

Here are some great places not mentioned yet to get started:

Nappy, Beautiful, high-res photos of black and brown people.

Women of Color in Tech,Images of women and non-binary people of color in tech that are free for use with proper attribution (#WOCinTechChat)

Lean In Collection, a library of images devoted to the powerful depiction of women, girls and the people who support them

Hexatar, a flat icon avatar maker

If you found value in this post and/or you’d like to add some resources, feel free to leave a comment below or share using the #ISWAT. Let’s continue the conversation and continue to grow as a community.


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